Understanding Tertiary Colors: A Guide to Mixing and Matching Different Hues

Tertiary colors are created by mixing a primary color with an adjacent secondary color on the color wheel. The specific tertiary colors produced depend on which primary and secondary colors are combined. Here are six common types of tertiary colors:

1. Red-Orange

Red-orange is a tertiary color that results from mixing the primary color red with the secondary color orange. It sits between red and orange on the color wheel and has a warm, vibrant appearance.

2. Yellow-Orange

Yellow-orange is obtained by combining the primary color yellow with the secondary color orange. It falls between yellow and orange on the color wheel and exhibits a sunny, energetic quality.

3. Yellow-Green

Yellow-green is a tertiary color created by mixing the primary color yellow with the secondary color green. It lies between yellow and green on the color wheel and possesses a fresh, lively character.

4. Blue-Green

Blue-green is produced by blending the primary color blue with the secondary color green. It falls between blue and green on the color wheel and has a cool, tranquil appearance reminiscent of nature.

5. Blue-Violet

Blue-violet is a tertiary color obtained by mixing the primary color blue with the secondary color violet. It sits between blue and violet on the color wheel and showcases a rich, deep hue.

6. Red-Violet

Red-violet is created by combining the primary color red with the secondary color violet. It falls between red and violet on the color wheel and exhibits a bold, regal quality.

These six tertiary colors provide additional nuances and shades within the color spectrum, offering more possibilities for color blending, design, and artistic expression.