5 Types of Teeth in Fishes and Their Functions

Fishes have a wide range of teeth types adapted to their specific feeding habits. Teeth in fishes can vary in size, shape, and location in the mouth. Here are five types of teeth in fishes and their functions:

Conical Teeth

Conical teeth are the most common type of teeth in fishes. They are long, pointed, and typically used for grasping and holding onto prey. Conical teeth are found in predatory fishes such as sharks, barracudas, and pikes.

Molariform Teeth

Molariform teeth are flat and have a broad surface area with ridges. They are typically used for crushing and grinding hard-shelled prey such as crabs and mollusks. Molariform teeth are found in fishes such as triggerfish and parrotfish.

Canine Teeth

Canine teeth are long and pointed, like conical teeth, but are much larger in size. They are typically used for grasping and holding onto larger prey. Canine teeth are found in fishes such as barracudas and goliath groupers.

Pharyngeal Teeth

Pharyngeal teeth are located in the pharynx, or throat, of some fishes. They are used for grinding and crushing food that has been partially digested in the stomach. Pharyngeal teeth are found in fishes such as catfish and carp.

Cardiform Teeth

Cardiform teeth are small, numerous, and tightly packed together. They are typically used for grasping and holding onto small prey such as plankton and other tiny organisms. Cardiform teeth are found in filter-feeding fishes such as herrings and anchovies.

In conclusion, fishes have a wide range of teeth types adapted to their specific feeding habits. By understanding the different types of teeth in fishes and their functions, you can better appreciate the diversity and complexity of fishes in the aquatic ecosystem.