The Complete Guide to Different Types of Hems: A Comprehensive Look

When it comes to sewing and garment construction, hems are the finished edges of fabric that are folded, secured, and stitched to prevent fraying and create a neat appearance. There are various types of hems that can be used depending on the desired look, fabric type, and sewing technique. Here are some common types of hems:

1. Double Fold Hem:

A double fold hem is created by folding the raw edge of the fabric up once and then folding it up again to encase the raw edge. It is commonly used on lightweight to medium-weight fabrics and is suitable for straight edges.

2. Single Fold Hem:

A single fold hem is created by folding the raw edge of the fabric up once and then stitching it in place. It is commonly used on lightweight fabrics and is suitable for straight edges. It provides a clean and simple finish.

3. Blind Hem:

A blind hem is a nearly invisible hem that is commonly used on skirts, trousers, and dresses. It involves folding the raw edge of the fabric under and creating small, discreet stitches that catch only a few threads of the fabric. The stitches are nearly invisible from the right side of the garment.

4. Rolled Hem:

A rolled hem is a narrow and delicate hem commonly used on lightweight and sheer fabrics such as chiffon or silk. It involves folding the raw edge of the fabric under multiple times to create a narrow, rolled edge. It is often finished with a straight stitch or a narrow zigzag stitch.

5. Bias Hem:

A bias hem is created by folding and stitching the raw edge of the fabric while utilizing the fabric’s bias, which is the diagonal direction of the fabric. Bias hems are commonly used on curved edges or flared garments as they allow for better drape and flexibility.

6. Decorative Hem:

A decorative hem is created using various decorative stitching techniques or trims to add a unique and decorative element to the hemline. This can include techniques such as topstitching, hemstitching, lace insertion, or attaching decorative trims like ribbons or ruffles.

These are just a few examples of the different types of hems that can be used in sewing and garment construction. The choice of hemming technique depends on factors such as the fabric type, garment design, desired finish, and personal preference.