Everything You Need to Know About Types of Deeds in North Carolina

In North Carolina, various types of deeds are used to transfer property ownership. Here are some common types of deeds used in North Carolina:

1. General Warranty Deed

A General Warranty Deed provides the highest level of protection to the buyer. It guarantees that the seller has clear title to the property and protects against any claims or defects in the title that may have occurred at any time in the past. It also includes covenants that ensure the seller will defend the buyer against any future claims.

2. Special Warranty Deed

A Special Warranty Deed, also known as a Limited Warranty Deed, provides a lesser level of protection compared to a General Warranty Deed. It guarantees that the seller has clear title to the property and protects against any claims or defects in the title that occurred during the seller’s ownership but not prior to that.

3. Quitclaim Deed

A Quitclaim Deed transfers the ownership interest from the seller (grantor) to the buyer (grantee) without making any guarantees or warranties about the title. It simply conveys whatever interest the grantor may have in the property, without providing any assurances regarding the title’s validity or any potential claims.

4. Special Purpose Deeds

In addition to the above deeds, North Carolina also recognizes various special purpose deeds, which include:

– Trustee’s Deed: Used when a property is transferred from a trustee to a beneficiary of a trust.
– Administrator’s Deed: Used when a property is transferred from the estate of a deceased person to an administrator who will manage the estate.
– Executor’s Deed: Similar to an Administrator’s Deed, but used when a property is transferred from the estate of a deceased person to an executor named in the decedent’s will.

It’s important to note that the specific requirements and legal implications of each type of deed can vary. It is recommended to consult with a qualified real estate attorney or legal professional to understand the specific details and implications of using different types of deeds in North Carolina.